Ask a question

Latest Questions

I was wondering why Nature publishes draft genomes, how genome papers are assessed for completeness and whether Nature realizes the damage they make to the scientific community by publishing drafts?

Go to the profile of Erica Pasini
Erica Pasini on Apr 07, 2017 • 1 answer
Genome sequences are obtained for many scientific purposes, from ensuring the antiviral transgene in papaya was in a defined place for regulatory reasons, to understanding the gene complex determining mating behavior in the ruff - http://www.readcube.com/articles/10.1038/ng.3483 The reason Nature journals insist upon annotated, chromosome-length reference assemblies preferably anchored to a linkage map is that these high quality genomes are more broadly useful to the scientific community, for example the spotted gar: http://www.readcube.com/articles/10.1038/ng.3526
Go to the profile of Myles Axton
Myles Axton on Apr 12, 2017

When I spoke to researchers at Columbia university, there were a number of questions for our editors:

Go to the profile of David Rogers
David Rogers on Mar 29, 2017 • 3 answers
And regarding the question about getting feedback prior to submitting a paper, submission, there is a video titled 'Presubmission enquiries at scientific journals' that covers this. Here is a link to that video: https://masterclasses.nature.com/courses/28/videos/520 You might find the module 'Submitting Your Paper' particularly useful for answering further questions in this area.
Go to the profile of David Rogers
David Rogers on Mar 31, 2017

Hi I'm taking the Masterclasses on Scientific writing and publishing and this paper came out in the Vol 543 of Nature (doi: 10.1038/nature21407). I'm wandering how it got published in Nature.

Go to the profile of Laurent Fattet
Laurent Fattet on Mar 08, 2017 • 1 answer
Hi Laurent, Thanks for your question. We cannot discuss individual papers in this way, but can let you know that all papers submitted to Nature are considered on the basis of scientific significance, and all published papers undergo robust, rigorous peer revi... Read more »
Go to the profile of Jill Adie
Jill Adie on Mar 13, 2017

When the authors choose the double-blind peer review system, is it their responsibility to mask their information in the manuscript or will it be done by the editor?

Go to the profile of Michal Lipinski
Michal Lipinski on Feb 20, 2017 • 1 answer
Thanks for your question Michal. The editorial office will remove information about the authors' names and affiliations from the manuscript file, however it is the author's responsibility to ensure that information about authorship is not given away, for example, by wording such as 'in our previous work (ref X)'.
Go to the profile of Elisa De Ranieri
Elisa De Ranieri on Feb 23, 2017

How can you become a professional editor of a scientific journal?

Go to the profile of Michal Lipinski
Michal Lipinski on Feb 10, 2017 • 1 answer
There are many routes into this profession. If you watch some of our editors' introductory videos: https://masterclasses.nature.com/channels/251-our-editors you will start to get a sense of how they moved from the lab into editorial wo... Read more »
Go to the profile of David Rogers
David Rogers on Feb 17, 2017

Does presentation of novel data (for example posters/talks at conferences) decrease the chance of publishing in Nature ('the data is not novel anymore')?

Go to the profile of Martin Neukam
Martin Neukam on Feb 04, 2017 • 1 answer
Hi Martin. Presenting your results at conferences, in talks, in posters or via pre-prints does not compromise the possibility that your paper is considered for publication at Nature, as long as you do not publish a conference paper or proceedings off the back of ... Read more »
Go to the profile of Federico Levi
Federico Levi on Feb 08, 2017

Is it OK to use tables of data already published to make new statistical analyses that bring novel results ?

Go to the profile of Rafael  Zamorano
Rafael Zamorano on Feb 03, 2017 • 1 answer
Hi Rafael, Thanks for your question. In fact, we had a similar question a little while ago, that was answered by one of our edito... Read more »
Go to the profile of David Rogers
David Rogers on Feb 07, 2017

I would liketo publish old data and original results never published from my Ph. D. They continue to be relevant since the field of research on pristine DNA damage by ionizing radiation moves slowly.

Go to the profile of Rafael  Zamorano
Rafael Zamorano on Feb 03, 2017 • 1 answer
I think you can proceed in the normal way here. Just describe how the data were obtained (and processed, if applicabl... Read more »
Go to the profile of Bart Verberck
Bart Verberck on Feb 07, 2017

Hi, can a Ph.D student contact for commissioned review papers or it's just for expert researchers?

Go to the profile of Zoya Iqbal
Zoya Iqbal on Jan 26, 2017 • 1 answer
At the Nature Reviews journals, there are two routes to initiating our review articles. The main route, which applies to the great majority of our articles, is commissioni... Read more »
Go to the profile of Darren Burgess
Darren Burgess on Feb 06, 2017

Is it acceptable to note in an article the % of contribution by the authors (e.g., 1st author 60%; 2nd author 30%; 3rd author 10% or is there an unspoken contribution about order of authors?

Go to the profile of Debra Ferdinand-James
Debra Ferdinand-James on Jan 13, 2017 • 1 answer
At Nature branded journals, the author contribution statement should identify the type of contribution each author has provided, for example “Author X designed the experiment and performed data analysis”. It is not possible to list contributions in terms of a percenta... Read more »
Go to the profile of Elisa De Ranieri
Elisa De Ranieri on Jan 20, 2017

What is the longest "first decision with peer-review " at Nature magazine? Is there a policy at Nature to make a decision involving reviewer reports within a certain time period, e.g., 4 months?

Go to the profile of Zeynep Aykut
Zeynep Aykut on Dec 07, 2016 • 1 answer
Thanks for your question. While there is no formal policy for the length of time in submitting a referee report, editors at Nature aim to get most decisions back to an author in around 45 days or le... Read more »
Go to the profile of Elisa De Ranieri
Elisa De Ranieri on Dec 20, 2016

What are the best steps in terms of structuring, planning, your actual writing?

Go to the profile of Paul Monahan
Paul Monahan on Nov 18, 2016 • 2 answers
Thanks to Darren for a really useful answer. For more information on writing the various sections of a scientific paper, as well as tips on structuring your work, visit the module 'From Introduction to Conclusion... Read more »
Go to the profile of David Rogers
David Rogers on Nov 21, 2016

Is there any problem if i will use some one article for collecting data?

Go to the profile of Khafzam Aljabry
Khafzam Aljabry on Oct 22, 2016 • 1 answer
Thanks for getting in touch with your question. If I understand your question correctly, you are asking if you can use the data from a published paper in your own wo... Read more »
Go to the profile of Bart Verberck
Bart Verberck on Oct 24, 2016

If one submits a thesis to the university library, does this affect one's ability to publish the same data in scientific journals?

Go to the profile of Anthony J. Chubb
Anthony J. Chubb on Apr 05, 2016 • 1 answer
Hi Anthony, Thanks for the question. Most PhD graduates (and their supervisors) are likely to want to publish their data in an academic journal, and with this in mind, some journals don’t consider the academic thesis to be a prior publication of the wo... Read more »
Go to the profile of Jill Adie
Jill Adie on Apr 11, 2016

What is the proper way to alert a someone when I find an author improperly analyzed their data? As a statistician, I find lots of errors in how many scientists use statistics.

Go to the profile of Andrew Ekstrom
Andrew Ekstrom on Mar 20, 2016 • 1 answer
Hi Andrew, Thanks for a really interesting question! We spoke to members of the Editorial Publishing and Policy teams at Springer Nature, and they had the following advice: - First of all, you are right that misuse of data should be raised with the chief editor at the journal, but unfortunately, in some cases this does not yield a response - One option would be to post a comment on the online article, if the journal provides for such commenting - Or alternatively, you could use one of the post-publication peer review platforms to raise the iss... Read more »
Go to the profile of Clio Heslop
Clio Heslop on Mar 22, 2016

I would like to ask when courses for individual persons will be available during 2016. Sincerely Alexios

Go to the profile of ALEXIOS-FOTIOS MENTIS
ALEXIOS-FOTIOS MENTIS on Feb 11, 2016 • 1 answer
Thanks for your question Alexios-Fotios! We are currently exploring how to make the online course available to individuals and investigating the technology we’ll ne... Read more »
Go to the profile of Claire Hodge
Claire Hodge on Feb 19, 2016

Hello Sir, I am PhD student in life sciences. After completing the doctoral studies I am willing to pursue a career in scientific journal editing. Are there any specific training programs available?

Go to the profile of APOORVA NARAIN
APOORVA NARAIN on Dec 10, 2015 • 1 answer
Hi Apoorva, Thanks for your question. This is something we get asked a lot, so we decided to produce a short video about ... Read more »
Go to the profile of Clio Heslop
Clio Heslop on Feb 26, 2016

As a non-native early career researcher, how can i improve my scientific writing for journals?

Go to the profile of Nazool-e Tabassum
Nazool-e Tabassum on Dec 04, 2015 • 1 answer
Long answer: Take every opportunity to write that you can find. In doesn't matter exactly what you wri... Read more »
Go to the profile of Ed Gerstner
Ed Gerstner on Dec 04, 2015